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TRAVELERS TRAVELING: OBAMA RE-ELECTION CAMPAIGN GOES FULL COMMIE, WITH VIDEO

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That’s the realistic ridicule of the awful campaign material — a video by the name of “The Road We’ve Traveled” especially produced about the glories of the Glorious Leader, Barack Obama, and his dandy helper, Joe Biden, narrated gloriously by that glowing, misty actor, Tom Hanks. About Hanks, who knew he’d gone full Socialist but apparently he has, what with his recent advocacy for Obama, terms 1 and what he’s asking for in this campaign video, term 2 (may that not ever happen); apparently Hanks has been visiting U.S. troops but from what he’s up to today, it seems he’s been doing so as a stepping stone akin to an iron ring around their necks (in that goal, I include Obama and his other peers).

And though the video be done technically very well — the narrator narrating so emotionally and with such evocation, the direction done so astutely, sound as sound as can be — it is the content of the thing that is so offensive, especially what is claimed in the video that is contradicted so sternly by reality. Hanks as narrator of such politics is like dirty socks on a soiled statue.

About that campaign video, the above poster is ridicule.

However, all glorious hyperbole aside, leave it to the ever curious Glenn Beck and his handy sidekick, Stu, to unearth the gruesome Socialist-Progressive-Communist skeleton in this Obama-Biden-Hanks re-election material: a book by the title of “The Road We’re Traveling” by Socialist, Stuart Chase, who just happened to be, also, as is Obama, a Socialist and a eugenicist: do away with the undesirables, especially when they’re extra vulnerable, can’t defend themselves and just may be an inconvenient truth in the womb.

Glenn Beck makes the additional point about the title-past-to-present renditional versions: Socialist, eugenicist inspiration declared ‘the road being traveled,’ and the Progressive eugenicists today (Obama, Biden, DNC, Hanks, etc.) declare that road has been “traveled”, as in, they’ve arrived, it’s here, they’re ready to poop on life, our nation, humanity and you again if you’ll only let them — though I am not sure they are even asking before their plans to proceed.

From Glenn Beck:

“GLENN: State control of communications and propaganda.

STU: This is like a mission statement for the Obama administration.

GLENN: May I? This book was not an indictment of it.

STU: Okay.

GLENN: It was saying “This is great.” Remember this is the guy who coined the term The New Deal. This is the road we’re traveling. Now, is it a coincidence? I’m sure it is. Is it a coincidence that anybody who has studied progressivism ‑‑ I mean, when I heard the name of this, this documentary, I mean, you were with me, Pat.

PAT: Oh, yeah.

GLENN: Immediately.

STU: Perked up right away.

GLENN: Wait a minute. I have that book. I had it wrong. I thought it was the Road We Traveled. The name of the book is The Road We’re Traveling.

PAT: That makes so much sense because we were traveling that road then. Now we’ve traveled it.

GLENN: We’ve traveled it.

PAT: And now it’s past tense. We’re there. It’s great.

GLENN: This is yet another ‑‑

PAT: It’s amazing.

GLENN: Another knife in the back to anybody who doesn’t know and a wink to anybody who does know the history. Everybody who ‑‑ anybody who is a Cass Sunstein, I mean, Cass Sunstein wanted this job because he’s a fan of Edward Bernays. He knows. He salivated over this job. He couldn’t wait. Those guys would absolutely know. I mean, remember when they were talking to us about Father Coughlin and they’re calling me Father Coughlin and we’re like, who the hell is Father Coughlin? They knew. They know these players. They know who Stuart Chase is. I really believe that whoever did this, they know exactly what they’ve done. They’ve said, “Yeah, yeah, it was X.” They couldn’t identify what it was. It’s state capitalism.

See, we were trying to do all these things in 1942 and Stuart Chase says, “If we do it right… this is 1942: “If we do it right, if you get it right, you will not be able to turn this ship off of that course.” Now the name of this movie is The Road We Traveled?

STU: Well, certainly by the standard they set up, they’re definitely guilty. If you remember back in 2010, we did that rally, you know, Restoring Honor in Washington and they immediately accused us of stealing the speech date of Martin Luther King as if we had any idea.

GLENN: Exactly right.

STU: They immediately accused us of that. So by their standard clearly this has to be intentional.

GLENN: So who is Stuart Chase? Who’s the guy who said he was going to change the free market enterprise, that this is state capitalism? Who was he? He was a Fabian Socialist, a member of the Fabian Society at Harvard, a friend of Walter Lippmann. Water Lippmann is the guy who every journalist in America has studied and hails as a hero. He was a eugenicist, a eugenics guy, he was a progressive, he was a member of the Woodrow Wilson administration.”

Let them run us down the road again? No.

Reference:
The story behind Obama’s doc “The Road We’ve Traveled”
– from Glenn Beck, March 16, 2012

GOP.com offered up a mocking, too
.

UPDATE:
More commentary on this Obama-video thing:

Contentions
The Problem With Obama’s Documentary
– by Peter Wehner, COMMENTARY, March 16, 2012

Here we go: Full-length Obama campaign documentary debuts
– by Allahpundit, HOT AIR, March 15, 2012

UPDATE II:

Evasive, misleading but well-placed words in this video production mislead and evade — that means, even by the Washington Post’s standards, “Obama (and Hanks in this video) lied.”

‘The Road We’ve Traveled:’ A misleading account of Obama’s mother and her insurance dispute
– by Glenn Kessler, Washington Post, March 19, 2012

…During the 2008 campaign, Obama frequently suggested his mother had to fight with her health-insurance company for treatment of her cancer because it considered her disease to be a pre-existing condition. In one of the presidential debates with GOP rival John McCain, Obama said:

“For my mother to die of cancer at the age of 53 and have to spend the last months of her life in the hospital room arguing with insurance companies because they’re saying that this may be a pre-existing condition and they don’t have to pay her treatment, there’s something fundamentally wrong about that.”

But then earlier this year, journalist Janny Scott cast serious doubt on this version of events in her excellent biography, “A Singular Woman: The Untold Story of Barack Obama’s mother.” Scott reviewed letters from Dunham to the CIGNA insurance company, and revealed the dispute was over disability coverage, not health insurance coverage (see pages 335-339).

Disability coverage will help replace wages lost to an illness. (Dunham received a base pay of $82,500, plus a housing allowance and a car, to work in Indonesia for Development Alternatives Inc. of Bethesda, according to Scott.) But that is different than health insurance coverage denied because of a pre-existing condition, which was a major part of the president’s health care law.

Scott writes that Dunham, who died in 1995 of uterine and ovarian cancer, had health insurance that “covered most of the costs of her medical treatment…The hospital billed her insurance company directly, leaving Ann to pay only the deductible and any uncovered expenses, which, she said, came to several hundred dollars a month.”

Dunham had filed the disability claim to help pay for those additional expenses. The company denied the claim because her doctor had suspected uterine cancer during an office visit 2 ½ months before Dunham had started the job with Development Alternatives, though Dunham said the doctor had not discussed the possibility with cancer with her. Dunham requested a review from CIGNA, saying she was turning the case over to “my son and attorney Barack Obama.”

When Scott’s book was published, the White House did not dispute her account. “The president has told this story based on his recollection of events that took place more than 15 years ago,” a spokesman said.

Now let’s look at what the movie does with this story. It does not directly repeat the claim that Obama’s mother was denied coverage because of a pre-existing condition, fighting for treatment in her hospital room. But look at what it does say:

1. Hanks says the president knew the cost of waiting on reform. (Though disability coverage was not an issue in the health care debate.)

2. The president says cancer “drained all her resources.” (Health insurance paid for most of her bills, so this is not the case of someone being bankrupted by tens of thousands of dollars in bills. Her salary of $82,500 in 1995 was the equivalent of $123,000 today, but Scott says she had little savings.)

3. Michelle Obama says Dunham “never really had good, consistent insurance.” (It is unclear what she means by this, except maybe that Dunham had different jobs, some of which did not provide insurance. But Dunham had good health coverage when the cancer was discovered.)

4. The first lady also suggests the death “could have been prevented.” (Again, it was not an insurance issue. Before going overseas, Dunham was too busy with work and had skipped an important test recommended by her U.S. doctor, dilation and curettage, that might have spotted the cancer earlier. Then an Indonesian doctor diagnosed her problem as appendicitis and removed her appendix. By the time the cancer was finally discovered, it was third-stage.)

5. Hanks says that Obama’s family felt “the pressure of rising costs and the fear of being denied or dropped from coverage.” (Maybe for disability, but not health insurance.)

In the end, the impression left by the film, especially if you watch it (go to the 8:45 mark), is very similar to Obama’s 2008 campaign rhetoric: His mother was denied health-insurance coverage, draining her resources, and with better coverage she might have lived longer. The film suggests this experience helped inspire the president to keep fighting for the health care law, even in the face of advice from aides that he accept a less-than-satisfactory compromise.

Note that none of the quotes in the film actually use the words “health insurance” or “health insurance coverage.” Instead, the first lady says “insurance” and Hanks says “coverage,” which could just as easily mean disability insurance. But that would not be as evocative—or as motivating.

Asked for response, the Obama campaign referred us to the previous White House statement on Scott’s book.

The Pinocchio Test

We use a “reasonable man” standard here, and we think there are few viewers of this film who would watch this sequence and conclude that Dunham was involved in anything but a fight over health-insurance coverage.

The disability-insurance dispute certainly may have motivated the president, but he has never explicitly stated that. In any case, the filmmakers must have known they had a problem with this story or else they would have recounted it as Obama had done in the 2008 campaign, using phrases such as “pre-existing conditions,” “health insurance,” and “treatment.”

Instead, they arranged the quotes and images to leave a misleading impression of what really happened…


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